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20130208
20130208
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)
about the noise bleed issue as well as the need for quiet environment in which to enjoy movies. and other immediate neighbor is his venerable kabuki hot springs and spa which obviously needs a tranquil environment for its patrons. the sound problem has occurred since pa'ina has had live performances. s sundance has had to give numbers refunds. this is a real issue for sundance and other businesses. -- -- -- and -- -- i want to comment briefly on the report, the supposed sound report that the project sponsor submitted. i want to stress what it is and what it isn't. from the very beginning that the project sponsor promised that they would bring us and consultant to make recommendations about noise abatement and containment, we still don't have that. what we have is a report that you have not received. we welcomed the consultants. instead we have a report that you now have. is asking for permission to go 20 decibels or more above the nubmer that the inspector for the entertainment commission has established. that is not responsible; that is not working to try to abate the noise.
. they live in a semi-arid or desert region. it's a very tough environment in whi tsurvive. and they are hunter-gatherers. they are peoe who live o t land. people survive really on the margins in that environment. it's very easy to go across the line and to get into real trouble through sickness. so the alleviation of sickness and suffering is a regular need that has to be addressed. the healing ceremonies that the kung perform are one way of addressing those needs of restoring balance and harmony and health. the sound of the music itself is a healing sound. the music comes to people on a subconscious level. it gets right to the core. and it has a way of transforming you. one of the most interesting things about the healing ceremonies of the kung is that there aren't any words. there's no text at all. yet that music is very powerful, very moving, very, very emotional music. and how does that work? you know, you hear people singing, and they're yodeling. you hear this wonderful melody, little fragments sung by one person put together with little fragments sung by another per
transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >>
and commercial corridor by helping our community create an environment that is supportive of small businesses and maintains a balanced mix of businesses. you can do this by not granting the request for conditional use authorization to domino's. the fillmore community commercial corridor from mcallister to geary, there is a total of 45 businesses on that strip. 25 of those businesses are eating and drinking establishments; which creates an overconcentration of eating and drinking establishments, about 55%. which is twice a little over twice the amount that is considered overconcentration. i also don't quite know where the 17.6% came from; that is being used. this business mix is particularly damaging to the fillmore, which has both high unemployment and economic disadvantaged communities. as you know money earned by independent businesses more likely to circulate within the local neighborhood. the fillmore was not always like this. it was one point it was thriving, but urban renewal changed everything. the business district reflects the culture and diversity of our community and by granting do
to abait the crimes in and around muni is actually effect the environment and if we can effect the environment by making certain that it is clean and that it is not, it does not become a haven for the criminal activity and i think that we will significant have changes in that accordingly. some of the new operations and efforts that we put in place in the last number of months. we are hoping to see some returns on that investment. one of the operations is sober muni shelter, that operation is conducted with officers who are experts in the field of drug recognition. we also run that operation with the support of sf hot teams and essentially individuals who are under the influence or inebriated on the lines or the buses and those individuals are looked at by way of means to getting them into intervention programs and or in many instances there is a need to deal with the criminal aspect in order to get them into those intervention programs. operation safe lines is an effort to identify muni lines where we see hot spots, if you will, of individuals who are fugitives from justice whe
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> pam: we continue our coverage tonight. on the manhunt for a man targetting police officers in los angeles. the suspect, a former police officer and navy reservist- christopher dorner - considers himself a whistle- blower -- who was wrongly fired by lapd because of it. he was furious about losing his job in 2008. and wrote a "manifesto'. discussing his plans for revenge. catherine heenan has details on that. >>catherine: despite all the photos showing a smiling christopher dorner. he has apparently been a very angry man. february 4th around 9 in the morning.he sat down to write his so-called manifesto on facebook. addressing it to "america". subject matter - "last resort" saying he wants to 'reclaim his name'. dorner says in part that he was targeted by the los angeles police department because he reported a fellow officer for k
attention to the environment. people are very environment conscious and i see community aggregations also to have renewable energy. it makes me very happy because in italy we have been following this path for a very long time. for example in the first six months of this year we installed photovoltaic panels larger than the united states all put together. it shows you the extent of the revolution happening. i am sure italian companies will be happy to work with the local institutions that have started to generate projects that will somehow go in that direction, and also we want to have parties and communication activities to show the people in the street that it is important to have sustainable behaviors and not to leave a carbon footprint behind us. >> [inaudible] >> yeah, if i understand correctly because -- you said about the innovation -- if we? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other example
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ same with aladdin. the biggest in bail. no one has lower prices, is faster or more professional. aladdin bail bonds. bigger because we're better. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot, even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely... looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. >> boeing has permission to conduct new test flights of the troubled 787 dream liner. here you see one landing today at boeing plant near seattle. until now this is the only flight approved by the government sin
take a step back and explain why the story is right. we've got an environment of improving consumer confidence, both domestically, despite the payroll tax hike and around the world. that means there's more demand for luxuries like travel and leisure, ie, cruises. on the other hand, in this industry supply is everything. it's like nordic tankers, too many ships, supply brings down the price of everything. supply of ships when the global economy seemed to be in great shape, the cruise ship builders went crazy. most of the enough capacity hit the market at the worst possible time, much of them coming on at the height of the great recession. during the recession the shipping company slowed down l orders for new ships and now new capacity is decelerating. from 2000 to 2010, the number increased at a 6.6 compound annual growth rate but should increate at only a 3.3% growth rate from 2012 through 2016. there's less new capacity coming on, less supply and that means, yes, s pricing. believe me, the tanker ships wish they were happening. there's still new supply coming on. it's got incredibl
, the federal reserve creating this environment where there's few alternatives and it's not necessarily driven by fundamentals. so do fundamentals not matter. >> the fundamentals are still good. we're still looking at fairly attractive, s&p 500, only about 13. i think the fundamentals are there, and the fed hasn't gott gone away yet. the fed hasn't taken await punch bowl yet. >> maria, i would just add that i think earnings have been really very impressive, and that's the big difference in my mind this year versus last year. in addition to all this stimulus, global stimulus, earnings are actually a lot better. i know the expectations were low, but no one was thinking 6% to 7% earnings growth and, okay, fine, revenues are growing at 2.2%, but that tells me margins are actually holding up which is the other case that everyone thought margins were going to roll over, the resiliency in the face of what we just went through in the fourth quarter and i think that's actually very impressive and i think the stocks will continue to work higher as earnings continue to improve. >> you also have to mentio
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
as part of their living environment, but see progress going forward. this is the promise of hope sf. this is personally what i recognize, what gavin started with his -- with the board of supervisors and make a big promise. but i get the lucky opportunity to see it through. i get to see the smiles of the people that are moving in and see their hopes continued. and again, it's the first of three phases for this project, but we have plans for alice griffith, for sunnydale, for potrero hill, for west side courts, every one of these will be touched. (applause) >> not just with their own money. we're going to see to it that our private partners, too, whether it's benny house or the sf foundation, the san francisco foundation that we are working very closely with already. they're helping me raise many of the private funds that go into the training services in support of services. and, of course, even our own staff at the mayor's office of housing at the cii. we're all buoyed by this. we all know at the end of it it's such a goal for everybody to have decent living lives and environment. th
to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ [ woman ] my boyfriend and i were going on vacation so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot, even on a holiday weekend. ♪ ♪ things are definitely... looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. this is so sick! i can't believe your mom let you take her car out. this is awesome! whoooo! you're crazy. go faster! go faster! go faster! go faster! no! stop...stop... (mom) i raised my son to be careful... hi, sweetie. hi, mom. (mom) but just to be safe... i got a subaru. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru. internet fame.. after she launched
in this environment? >> well, i think what you're seeing is a slow-down in earnings growth. but on the other hand, the economy is doing somewhat better than it was, let's say six months ago. so investors who come into the year looking for very fast earnings growth as justification for their stock prices may be somewhat disappointed. so the economy is getting a little bit better, but wave come out of the recession. we've had a full recovery in profits, so here, going forward, we expect to see slower growth and consistency, i think, is the key in that kind of environment. >> tom: you mentioned a full recovery in profits. are stocks, broadly speaking, at this level expensive given the lack of earnings growth that you forecast? >> i don't think they're either expensive or cheap. and the reason i say that is because the standard & poors 500, which is a proxy for the stock market, has about $100 of earnings expected underneath it and it trades at $1500. with the stock market trading at 15 times underlying earnings, that's about a normal valuation for the market. i think profits can be had if you look f
the environment and put some cash into your pocket or an invitation to thieves to steal your cell phones and tablets? >> a company that buys and resells cell phones in the middle of a disagreement with cathy lanier, gary nurenberg has more right now. >> reporter: it's called an ecoatm offers you instant money for a cell phone. >> people love the instantaneous cash right off the bat. >> reporter: do you have the device with you? lots of devices out there. >> there's over 300 million unrecycled phones in the united states that are no longer being used. >> reporter: ecoatm protects the environment and your local community. d.c. police chief cathy lanier said on thursday many of the stoles are stolen -- phones are stolen. >> we have a difference of opinion. >> reporter: the machines don't make it easy for thieves. >> to sell a device you must be 18 years of age. present a valid government issued photo id and provide a thumbprint. your id will be verified remotely by a human and your device will be matched against the stolen device data base. >> reporter: one works in fair oaks mall. >> my vi
restricted environment and religious environment. we know people who are narrow minded at a late age. >> you know narrow minded people here at fox? >> two words, book deal, three words, pose for playboy, get a reality show. >> you say there are dollar signs behind it. >> it leads to one of the ame or the oxygen movies. or maybe it is a job at the mall. if you are in this family you can't get a job at the mall. >> also she wants what every other girl has, a gay best friend. after awhile they realize they hate each other. when they come to the real ization they want the gay best friends like the jimmy choo's. >> she is going to call it post hate. >> that would be a reality show i would be interested to watch. >> i am just having fun with you, crazy lady. >> disneyland is more like disney racist land. a trip to a theme park was marred. he approached alice in wonderland's white rabbit and was rebuffed. >> how did that make you feel? >> sad. >> how come? >> because i wanted to hug him. >> his older brother fared no better. >> then i went up to try to hold his hand and he was flicking my hand off.
environment -- we did an extensive analysis to try to make sense why we have had the problem and have had so long. host: if you would like to join the conversation from eastern and central time zones -- mountain and pacific -- and if you are a health professional -- laudan aron, here are the numbers, and we see where the united states ranks in life expectancy compared to other countries. who in the study are the comparison points and how the u.s. to? guest: the panel basically compared the health outcomes in the united states to 16 other high-income democracies. it western europe, canada, australia, japan. basically countries we consider our peers in a number of the means. we ranked dead last in life expectancy among males and the comparison group and next-to- last for females. life expectancy at birth is a cumulative indicator of multiple causes of death. but as we can see, we are not doing very well. host: the disadvantage appears to exist across all ages and demographics. do you have a sense of why? guest: well, one of the real striking findings was how many different domains we are falli
is an architectural firm that helps people realize opportunities in the historic-built environment. i'm an expert in navigating the needs and the issues our clients face with their historic properties. i'm well versed in assessing and applying the secretary of interior standards for the treatment of historic properties. and i believe these historic properties are places of meaning and memories and are important to our community and should be preserved. for over 25 years i have been making culturally significant buildings and sites relevant for future generations. i focus on restoration, rehabilitation and adapted reuse. as well as built on new design, design of new buildings within the sensitive historic context. i understand fully how to embrace change. identifying and celebrating what makes these places special while at the same time accommodating new and contemporary uses. some of my projects include the restoration of the angel island immigration station, the goldman school of public policy at u.c. berkeley, both the restoration of the existing historic building and the design and constructio
, not packed in like sardines environment. >> it will be a timed event and folks will have to register online or through some other means. >> public opinions vary. >> i'd like to get up there. i'd certainly go for a lottery ticket if it was out there. >> yes i do agree with that. >> why? >> exactly for the same thing. it's good to see what's being dr the community. >> it's way too much money. it's not an area we need to spend our money. people are out of work. >> other events such as a planned cycling crossing, and a fireworks spectacular bay wide. >> that's in the private sector's purview and public funds won't be use. >> when golden gate officials expected 50,000 walkers, 800,000 showed up. >> how do get 200,000 other people out there hasn't gun and there's only 6 months left. >> we'll keep you informed. >>> a mix of celebrities and golf process took to the links today in the -- pros took to the pebble beach tournament. >> bill murry and green bay packers aaron rogers were also there. at the end of the first day, american hunter may ham and brit know's hustle knox shared the lead at 6 under
and you can reach out to people and i like that type of environment so i want to create that with my space. and we joined the neighborhood association and the merchant's association and we have been going to all of the meetings and just hearing the different things and they want more non-alcoholic drinks and so that everybody can come in and have a good time and we want to be here for a long time and be able to support the community and the city that we live in. >> okay. thank you very much. >> we can now hear from the police department. >> representing san francisco, police. lay has filed an application with the california department of beverage control seeking a license for 313 ivy street and for the purpose of this hearing, the california department of alcohol befrage control seeks a determination to the board of supervisors as to the approval or denial. >> from the time period, july 2011 to july, 2 on 12, there is no calls for service at this location or police reports. this is located in plot 558. and applicant premises is not located in a high crime area. >> it is located in the cens
justice, strong economy, and sustainable environment. that experience includes being the director of the san francisco bicycle coalition and being the transportation policy director for spur, san francisco planning and urban research. and a project director for the san francisco transit riders union. in those jobs, especially in the latter two, i learned what it takes to provide excellent public transit as efficiently as possible and at least -- a the least possible cost to the taxpayers. and i'm proud to say that golden gate transit has done a really good job. these are hard times, as you know, for public transit agencies. we had to cut quite a bit of service, but we were smart about it and we also managed to add some service. and rider ship is increased on golden gate transit. * if reappointed, i hope to continue to work to improve golden gate transit and also to work to improve bicycle and pedestrian access and safety on the bridge. and i respectfully request your reappointment. >> thank you. supervisor cohen. >> thank you. i guess to the other speakers that are going to be com
and the preservation community and a lot of the community leaders from the laplia area from their environment which was a sad and difficult decision. our community report for fiscal year 2011-2012 is here, we brought some additional copies for people who are in the public today to see, you'll find great overview, the report reflects what we've known for a long time, our staff members are the best city employees out there and works to keep our parks safe and beautiful, so again we have some copies and we try to distribute most of it electronically, so you can also go to our website and download it from the front page of our highlight section. i want to very quickly bring up miriam serel who is a planner from the livable streets division from mta who is going to provide a brief update of some summary and key findings from our separated bikeway program, mta has recently completed a little bit of a survey and they have some preliminary findings on the project and miriam is going to present them and i have a handout for the commission and i think there's some extra copies here for the public. >> thank y
there are no such problems with wind farms. it's or solar its a superior environment for rate certainty and it would both offer residential customers and the city considerably less risk around the of service. >> that is once you have built out. >>> yes, we have a farrell rapid build out schedule for that very reason we would start the program obviously with 100% bought power and then, quickly, roll out local resources to hedge that and so you would have within a couple of years a significant hedge on your wholesale price of power and by your four-year, five, year six, you are over 50% mitt gated and whatever happens in the market whether it goes up or down it is hit the c c a customer less than it would hit the p g and e kir or the direct access customer who have a more direct exposurethat commodity price. >> and then the residents you bring along after the commercial customers are enrolled. >> well in general because year face one is currently focused on the residential class we are recommending that the residential customers be added quickly in phase two along with the commercial customers to b
with the heated environment inside, it doesn't help at all. >> reporter: good ways to avoid static hair? >> in the cold winter months, you need to cut your shampoo regimen in half. >> reporter: and pick your shampoo carefully. >> choose shampoos that are sulfate free and nonfoaming. >> reporter: and moisturize, moisturize, moisturize. when getting out of the shower, blot your hair. don't vigorously dry it with a towel. >> when you shake it dry with a towel, you are roughing up -- roughing it up, which will only make the flyaways worse. >> reporter: perfect tips for perfect hair in the new year. >>> and now, maryland's most accurate forecast. >> we'll start off with maryland's most powerful radar. you can see just a little bit of banding coming out of the northwest. the main system continues to be off to the east right now. large, powerful storm swirling out to sea. we're picking it up on maryland's most powerful radar. a little bit of wintry weather here near harford county. winter weather is actually coming down as light rain. but there may be some embedded sleet, maybe a few flakes. c
. a lot of our transactions are coming from the international environment. buyers from brazil, buyers from europe in general. it is definitely helping the florida market. i would say a large percentage. a lot of these deals are coming from people migrating from colder climates. i have a lot of snowbirds coming down here. florida is looking more and more attractive. regard to the luxury market, it is doing extremely well. of course, you do not have the obstacle you have in the lower-priced market because you have a lot of cash buyers. a lot of people who continue to have money. that way you are continuing to see a lot of these bidding wars. dagen: i have heard stories. i have heard stories in terms of miami, particularly. the condo hotels became a very tricky proposition when the financing dried out. are you seeing some of the financing come back for those properties? >> not specifically. a lot of developers are staying away from those properties. i have seen many developers planning new projects. the condo hotel market has really not revamped the same way. you are just being straight up co
's go along or get along. it turns into a weird almost brazil like environment where you are basically -- you can't give homeowners money for their mortgage programs because that would create moral hazard while you are handing trillions to banks because they are too big to go after. this is the one of core ideological things we ran into. when it came to the banks anything and everything was on the table. saving the banks of priority one, two and three. tarp was supposed to help homeowners. it was supposed spo help almost 4 million people stay their homes. the justifications for not doing the right thing, not reducing principle, not fulfilling the promise. we can't help an undeserving homeowner. that would be terrible. the financial institutions that rode this country into the ditch, the unemployment -- that's not what get themes money. let's make sure they are able to pay their billions in bonuses because that might upset the system. it was an incredible double standard. >> jon: it's a bizarre way of treating -- the people created the crisis have to be coddled because you never know wh
and they are rooted to the environment there. the economy is based on fishing and degreing all things very specific to the region. so the culture is based in being able to stay in these special places. what the film is about is the way the places places places art the moment. >> stephen: the economy down there seems to be based on heart rending sandness. [ laughter ] >> no it's -- >> stephen: obviously it's ultimately a hopeful tale but it's heart piercing at times. >> well, you know, i mean, one of the things that the film is about is the way in a the people in the bathtub not just survived this storm but also, you know, keep a hold of their joy and this culture that is incredibly sell bra tory and joyous. >> stephen: we have an example of that, a lip clip that talks just to take. >> but me and my daddy we stay right here. we see what the earth is for. ♪ ♪ >> stephen: it is unbelievably beautiful, joyous and wild when i first saw that i thought this is like where the wild things are but with people. [ laughter ] >> it is wild. you know, and when you go down there it's a wild culture. >> stephe
the discussion about climate and environment. that was done in gm and it's a great vehicle. >> jon: right, right. so you are happy with the arrangement? >> yeah, they let us do it. >> jon: when you went in there, how difficult for you? you had not run a car company previously? [laughter] >> never. >> jon: you are the most genial guy that has run these companies. there's a bunch of guys there 20 years, 30 years, they've been working hard. you walk in and you've run a company but it's at&t. are they mad at you? are they mean to you? how do you get their trust, respect and enthusiasm? >> i asked what went wrong at gm. one of the answers was we didn't do anything wrong, the economy got us. it was interesting i said it didn't get a lot of other car companies, you know so why did it pick on us. >> jon: where did the meeting go from there? >> sort of downhill from there. [ laughter ] >> jon: right. what was your due diligence center field how long did you spend there gaining the information you needed to start making decisions to reorganize the company? >> i was appointed chairman in august, not c.e.o.
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> new controversy surrounding new jersey senator robert menendez. an aide acknowledging that he contacted past officials to help donor and medicare dispute and didn't know the former doctor was under investigation for medicare fraud and did not in the investigation. and carol broke the story. he's in bigger hot water, he made two phone calls? >> one phone call to a person who receives medicare payments, decides whether or not taxpayers are getting defrauded and one sit-down meeting with that career official's boss. >> greta: both were investigating this doctor in florida for how much money in fraud? >> they concluded over two to three year period he had overbilled the government 9 million dollars for eye injection. lots of senators make phone calls for constituents all the time and then there's some-- there's a phone call and there's getting in deep. >> my colleague and i work
that is to protect methods and the secrets it has. but given the changes in the environment, given the changes in the nature of our government, cia needs to play a part in this large a role. now the head of cia does not sit on top of the key intelligence community, but is part of a larger community that is led by another. my objective is to make sure our capabilities are leveraged and empowered to responsibilities, the missions of the rest of the government, the department of the homeland security is a new creation, and they need intelligence like everyone else. there was resistance at the time of the rgpa that they did not want to break some of the past practices. a lot of that resistance is overcome, and cia analyses the benefit of having someone sit on top of that committee. >> that is very helpful. i will yield back. >> that you very much, senator. senator king? you want to turn on your mike? >> thank you for your testimony and stamina today. i should tell you in an earlier hearing secretary panetta was testifying before the armed services committee, and he strongly endorsed your nominatio
. the condo market in the major environments is on fire. melissa: really? dottie, do you agree with that? yeah, real estate is back, buy, buy, buy. i heard that before. tell me in a convincing way. >> no, it's back. in fact, new york a year and a half ago, but back across the country, and there's also a shortage of inventory. you have to buy it and buy it quick. melissa: that's a good sales pitch. madison, in l.a., things flying off the lot there, i was going to say "shelf," but there's not the shelf. >> flying off the cove, yes. they are flying, and the market has taken off exciting, this year, so far, we had a big sale of $75 million in malibu with a foreign buyer. it's taking off to a good start. melissa: ridiculous. jeff, let me ask you, when i look at the lot of the markets that are on fire right now, it really concerns me because it looks like all the same problems that we saw last time around, for example, one of the markets you think is going to do the best is phoenix. i know zillow projectses prices in phoenix could be up 8.5% next year. that makes me nervous. >> the reality is that t
is precious to the european union. but which also must be respectful of the environment. and that's why world development will complement that. not offsetting these two policies against one another. that will be easy to do. we must keep the pedestal of european policies because otherwise how can we go from the? my second principle is that the budget, the financial framework which is to be proposed must continue the growth partner we adopted in june of this year. last year. now, that means that we must promote innovatioinnovatio n, infrastructure, new energy, new forms of energy because there will be no consistency is in june we were to set out a roadmap and then we're have a deflationary pack and the fall of the european financial framework. my third principle is that the budget must support the most vulnerable of europeans, those most exposed to the crisis, the poorest of the poor. the funds for their must not only be kept going, they must have more money paid into them. we have the globalization adjustment fund. it is necessary. we are to deal with the restructure. many countries have to fa
to be a safe haven environment for those who want to invest in real estate or buy a place here, to go shopping or hit the trendy restaurants or bars or a show. we're going to have a look for you the next hour of varney about two and a half million dollar apartment, what you get for that kind of money and who is buying these places? manhattan's real estate market is booming. it's a seller's market right now. what does it take? we're going to have the answers to all of that with you, charles, coming up at 10:30 on varney. charles: i can't wait. sometimes i stand in central park and look at the apartments, are there that many rich people out there? i can't wait, sandra, thanks a lot. >> exactly. charles: don't talk about home builders stocks not necessarily on varney, but they've been soaring in the past year, nicole, i know you've got one that's more than doubled. >> i thought you were going to say a manhattan the apartment not everyone is rich in manhattan. >> are you serious? >> yeah, i'm serious, come on, let's get to the stock and we've talked about the housing recovery and what we have seen
for in an open environment like this. they're normally trained to urban environments. but it can happen. they can do it. they can get on his trail. and they can apprehend him at night. >> chairman, i'm curious. this is so difficult. because people can have traumatic experiences in their life, bad experiences at work, and they don't turn out like this. and this kind of a horrific situation. but in the manifesto, dorner wrote, "self-preservation is no longer important to me. i do not fear death, as i died long ago on january 2nd, 2009." that was the day he says he was fired from the lapd. now, we have no indication that dorner was on the radar of the fbi. should someone like him have been, or is it just too much to ask? >> you just don't know. if he had these type of supposed while he was a police officer, certainly the lapd was aware of that. we don't know all the circumstances of why he was fired, but i can imagine if you see his actions today, that some of those attitudes, some of those actions may have played in to why he was terminated. so it was probably bigger than the event that was listed
america, particularly mexico. europe's stabilizing. i say it's good. in that environment, you have -- you have correctly placed your hotels. >> well, it's really interesting. for us, our business is so dependent on economic activity, business confidence and consumer confidence. you're exactly right. january in china our rev par numbers were up 6%. that's after a slow down. the government transitions almost behind us, chinese new year will be behind us. we see china picking up. latin america was the strongest growth region for two years in a row, slowed down last year because of argentina. we haven't talked about africa which is another place where global capital flows are coming in in ways we have never seen before. >> let's talk about china for a moment. we see china as having a big year in 2013. a lot of people had penalized your stock, taken it down to the -- well at that point into the 50s because they felt you were overexpanding in china. you're probably as a percentage of what people are putting their capital in, the highest of any of the companies i follow in terms of commitment to
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we're keeping a close eye on what could be a record-breaking storm affecting millions across the northeast. two massive weather systems are on track to converge overnight. blizzard warnings are in effect for boston, new york, providence. some areas could be digging out from several feet of snow. the travel nightmare could soon be felt across the country as flight cancellations pile up creating a ripple effect at airports from coast to coast. amtrak is suspended service from new york city up into new england. some salt trucks already hitting the road getting a head start before the storm hits. we're joined by our meteorologist chad myers. when can we expect these two massive storms to meet, and what kind of an impact are we talking about? >> looks like 8:00 a.m. tomorrow morning is when the first snowflakes will star
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> what do you think about english only? well, in arizona that debate is heating up, that issue a bill forbidding agencies sending out documents in other language, but english. some say it's a violation of civil rights, but disagrees, it will save taxpayers money. good evening, sir, tell me what this bill is. >> well, thank you, greta. first thank you for having me and thank god for another day of freedom in this great country he's given us. greta, you know, quite honestly this bill does one thing and one thing only, it adheres to what the people in arizona asked for. what i mean by that, a few short years ago people passed 103. and 103 said this, english is the official language of the state of arizona all government transactions and correspondence shall be conducted in english and this
. >> but they've created this environment for this to happen. what do you mean? that's a risk decision that companies are making for some reason they've decided they need to operate with massive and huge cash balances, okay? and for whatever reason, there have been an absence of investors like iron horn who said, give me back the cash. find a way to redistribute it. i don't know, bob, in terms of macroeconomic development -- >> i think some of the corporate cash comes from firms that have made money and they don't feel like taking risk in this environment. apple is the technology company and i can understand apple's view that they have freedom of cash on the balance sheet. some of this is complicated. some of the cash is overseas, they bring it home, thee incur some tax liability. cash on your balance sheet is freedom. it's freedom from bankers. >> we're going to slip in a quick break. bob, you're going to be with us for the rest of the hour. and i'm going to send it back to pebble beach and the one and only becky quick. >> when we come back, we're talking about putting money to work b
this rover to discover habitable environments on mars, and we did discover one already, early in the mission. we found that we landed right on an ancient stream bed, where water was once flowing kind of up to your kneecaps. >> reporter: 100% sure it was water? the kind of water we have on earth? >> i wouldn't say 100%, but it's the most likely thing. you know, we know that there's water on mars frozen in ice today. and in the past, we think the conditions were more that liquid water could have been staple. >> reporter: "curiosity" is embarking on a new task on mars, after practicing on earth-- drilling into martian rocks for the first time. using remotely controlled tools built into the rover, nasa will bore into rocks to find out what they're made of, and if they contain clues to life on the red planet. >> this whole arm, in a series of tai chi moves, moves around and sieves that powder, and then dumps it into some inlets that are on the top of the rover deck, so that instruments which are inside the rover can analyze it for its chemistry. >> reporter: the mars mission wouldn't have been po
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